May 1867

Holstons in History: May 22, 1867

After earning a victory against the Knoxville Base Ball Club on May 11, 1867, the Holston Base Ball Club immediately set their sights on the Mountain City Base Ball Club of Chattanooga. The time, place, and final scores of the “friendly match games” were not reported, just this colorful summary in the May 22, 1867, edition of Brownlow’s Knoxville Whig:

BASE BALL.—The “Mountain City” Base Ball Club, of Chattanooga, visited our city last week and played friendly match games with each of the clubs of this city, of course proving themselves too much for our clubs, having had more experience, and being the champion Club of the State. They also gave musical concerts while here, and were voted “bully boys” by every one. The games were played in the presence of a large number of ladies and gentlemen, and a deep interest was manifested by spectators.

Holstons in History: May 11, 1867

On May 8, 1867, The Knoxville Whig noted that a rematch of the May 4, 1867, base ball game between the Holston and Knoxville clubs was imminent, “but at what particular time, we have not learned.” It occurred one week later on Saturday, May 11, 1867, and resulted in what may be the Holston’s first victory.

The match was documented in The Knoxville Whig on May 15, 1867:

Knox-Whig-1867-05-15-Base Ball

Base Ball.—Another of those exciting match games came off on Saturday, in the presence of a large crowd of ladies and gentlemen. The contestants were the Knoxville and Holston Clubs of this city, in which the Holston Club was victorious.

Holstons in History: May 4, 1867

Holstons-in-HistoryThe earliest reference to the Holston Base Ball Club playing a match in Knoxville occurs in the May 8, 1867,  The Knoxville Whig. The match was played four days earlier on Saturday, May 4, 1867, (most likely on the grounds of the Knoxville Base Ball Club) and resulted in a loss for the Holstons:

Base Ball Match.—An exciting base ball match came off here on last Saturday evening, between the Knoxville and Holston Clubs of this city. A large crowd of gentlemen and ladies were spectators. The game was hotly contested by both clubs, resulting in a victory for the Knoxville Club. We understand the match will be repeated soon, but at what particular time, we have not learned.

Holstons in History: May 1, 1867

To date, the earliest mention of the Holston Base Ball Club occurs in connection with Tennessee’s first State Convention of Base Ball Players held in Chattanooga on Wednesday, May 1, 1867. Knoxville sent the Holston Base Ball Club and the (imaginatively named) Knoxville Base Ball Club; Chattanooga furnished six clubs; and Memphis and Tazewell supplied one club each. The results of the organizational meeting were published in the Knoxville, Chattanooga, Memphis, and Nashville newspapers, the latter of which, the Nashville Union and Dispatch, printed this summation on May 3, 1867:

Base Ball Convention. A State Convention of Base Ball Players met at Chattanooga on the 1st inst. The following clubs were represented :

 

Enterprise, Memphis.
Mountain City, Chattanooga.
Lookout,                     “
Lightfoot,                   “
Lightbodies,                “
American,                    “
Southwestern,                “
Knoxville, Knoxville.
Holston,          “
Sturm, Tazwell.

 

The meeting was called to order by G. M. Brown, chairman of the committee.

 

Mr. Clay C. Runyan, from Sturm Club, of Tazwell, was appointed Recording Secretary pro tem.

 

It was moved and seconded that a committee on credentials be appointed by the chair. Carried.

 

Messrs. E. D. Lyons. Mountain Citv, C. C. Siegfried, Lookout, and R. J. Fowler, Lightfoot, were appointed.

 

It was then moved and seconded that a committee of three be appointed to draft a constitution and by-laws. Carried.

 

Messrs. C. C. Seigfried, of Lookout, R. L. Woodward, of Holston, and E. D. Lyons, of Mountain City, were appointed, and brought in the rules and regulations adopted by the National Base Ball Association, which were read and adopted by sections, as the rules to govern the Tennessee Base Ball Association, which were then adopted as a whole by the meeting.

 

It was moved and adopted that the Mountain City Club, of Chattanooga, be considered the champion club.

 

The meeting then proceeded to the election of officers, resulting as follows: W. J. Ramage, Lookout Club, of Chattanooga, President ; R. L. Woodward, Holston Club, of Knoxville, 1st Vice President ; M. D. Graham, Enterprise Club, of Memphis, 2d Vice President ; Spencer Munson, Knoxville Club, of Knoxville, Recording Secretary ; G. M. Brown, Mountain City Club, of Chattanooga, Corresponding Secretary ; George S. Duncan, Southwestern Club, of Chattanooga, Treasurer.

 

The following committees were then appointed:

 

A Committee on Rules and Regulations was appointed by the President, consisting of the following delegates: R. J. Fowler, Lightfoot, chairman ; G. M. Brown, Mountain City ; M. D. Graham, Enterprise ; Spencer Munson, Knoxville ; R. L. Woodward, Holston ; J. Whitney, American ; and L. Murrin, Light bodies.

 

Committee on Nomination—R. L. Woodward, chairman ; E. H. Brown, Mountain City ; Chatman, Enterprise.

 

Committee on Judiciary—Clay C. Runyan, Sturm Club, chairman ; Geo. S. Duncan, Enterprise ; R. L. Woodward, Holston; and E. D. Lyons, Mountain City.

 

Also a Committee on Printing was appointed as follows: C. C Seigfried, Lookout, chairman ; Spencer Munson, Knoxville; R. J. Furlow, Lightfoot; and on motion W. J. Ramage, President elect, was added to the committee.

 

It was then moved and seconded that the proceeding of this meeting be published in the Knoxville, Chattanooga, Memphis and Nashville papers, also a copy be sent to the New York Clipper for publication, which was carried.

 

A motion was then made and carried that the first regular annual meeting on the second Wednesday of September, 1867, be held at Memphis.

 

A motion was then made that a day be selected for a tournament of all the Base Ball Clubs in the State to contest for the championship of the same, which was lost.